’Uthaimeen: People are Either Excessive Extremists, Excessively Neglectful or Balanced when it Comes to Boycotting and Other Issues

August 3, 2014 § Leave a comment


Shaikh ’Uthaimeen, may Allaah have mercy on him said, “Three men, in front of them is a sinner.

One of them says, ‘I’m not going to give this sinner salaam and will boycott him, distance myself from him and not speak to him.’

The second says, ‘I will go along with this sinner and give him salaam, smile in his face, invite him over and respond to his invitations, he’s just like a righteous man to me.’

The third says, ‘This sinner, I hate him for his sins and I love him for his eemaan, I will not boycott him unless doing so will lead to his rectification, if ostracising him doesn’t lead to his rectification but instead causes him to sin even more, then I won’t boycott him.’

So I say: the first person is an excessive extremist, the second is someone excessively neglectful—and the third one is balanced.

We say the same in all issues of worship and all dealings with the creation, people are either neglectful, extremists or balanced.”

Majmoo’ Fataawaa wa Rasaa’il Fadilatish-Shaikh Muhammad ibn Saalih al’Uthaimeen, vol. 1, p. 43.

Al-Fawzaan on the Fact that Boycotting is Only Done if There is Benefit to it and if it Doesn’t Lead to Greater Harm

February 13, 2014 § Leave a comment


Questioner: The noble Prophet said, “It is not allowed for a Muslim to boycott his brother for more than three. They meet and so this one turns away from that one, and that one from this. And the best of them is the one who initiates giving the salutation to his brother,” [Bukhaari] or something to that effect, if the person who I argued with doesn’t pray or fast and does bad things, is my dispute with him something haraam?  What [exactly] does this hadith mean?

Al-Fawzaan: Boycotting [al-Hajr] is to stop talking to someone, to stop sitting with them and giving them salaam.

Boycotting a believer is not allowed for more than three days if it is about something worldly, in fact he should reconcile with his brother and give him salaam when he meets him.

To begin with, he shouldn’t [even] boycott over a worldly matter, but if it does take place then it should not be for more than three days, this is what the hadith, ‘It is not allowed for a Muslim to boycott his brother for more than three days,’ means, i.e., when the ostracising is over a worldly issue.

As for when it is over a sin which the person being boycotted has committed, a major sin which he has not left, then he must be advised and directed to fear Allaah the Mighty and Majestic.  If he does not desist from that sin and does not repent, then he is boycotted, because the boycotting acts as a reprimand and deterrent for him, maybe he will repent [because of it].

Unless ostracising him is something which will lead to harm, whereby it is feared that he will increase sinning and that it will result in greater evil—then in such a situation it is not allowed to boycott him, boycotting a sinner is only allowed if there is benefit to it and if it doesn’t lead to greater harm.

And success lies with Allaah.

Al-Muntaqaa min Fataawaa Fadeelatis-Shaikh Saalih ibn Fawzaan ibn ’Abdillaah al-Fawzaan, vol. 1, pp. 397-398.

Also see here and here for further articles discussing this topic.

Ibn Baaz Asked About Interacting with Innovators and Knowing When to Boycott Them or Not

December 22, 2013 § Leave a comment


Questioner: What do you advise us with concerning interacting with innovators who we see and speak to and deal with almost every day?

Ibn Baaz: It is obligatory to boycott them for their innovations, if they openly exhibit innovations then it is obligatory to boycott them after having advised and directed them, because a Muslim advises his brother and warns him from open innovations and sins which Allaah has forbidden him, so if he repents [then that is what is desired] and if not then he deserves to be boycotted, and he is dealt with in this manner so that maybe he will repent, maybe he will feel remorse, maybe he will come back to the truth.

Unless the boycotting will result in something whose end is not praiseworthy, then it is not carried out—if leaving off boycotting is better in terms of [bringing that person closer to the] religion and greater in good and closer to being successful, then he is not to boycott him but instead continues to advise him and warns him about the falsehood [that he is in] and he does not boycott him, hoping that Allaah will guide him due to that.

For the believer is like a doctor, if he sees that a cure is beneficial, he carries it out, and when he sees that it is not, he leaves it—so boycotting falls under the category of being a cure, if it has a good effect and is of benefit, he does so, [implementing it] as a form of cure, [hoping] that he may repent and may turn back from his mistake when he sees that his brothers have ostracised him.

But if the boycotting results in greater evil and an increase in the [number of the] people of evil and helps them—then he is not to be ostracised but rather sincerely advised and directed continually and shown the abhorrence of what he has done and he does not show him that he agrees with the falsehood that he carries out, but [he does] persist in advising him sincerely and directing [him].

Fataawaa Nurun ’alad-Darb, vol. 3, p. 40.

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