Ibn Baaz Called Him, “My Shaikh in Tawheed.”

September 20, 2016 § Leave a comment


Shaikh Ibn Baaz said about Shaikh Taqiyud-Deen al-Hilaali, may Allaah have mercy on them both, “My Shaikh in tawheed.”

Sabeelur-Rashaad fi Hadyi Khairil-Ibaad, vol. 1, p. 27.

He Memorised the Quraan in Six Months and then Helped Produce the Fataawa of Ibn Taymiyyah

November 24, 2015 § Leave a comment


Shaikh Muhammad bin Qaasim, may Allaah have mercy on him, said that when, at a young age, he wanted to help his father, Shaikh ’Abdur-Rahmaan bin Qaasim رحمه الله collect and arrange the fatwaas and writings of Shaikhul-Islaam Ibn Taimiyyah, his father made it a condition that in order for him to be allowed to help he must firstly memorise the Quraan, he said, “So I finished memorising the entire Quraan in six months and then began helping him produce this formidable collection.” [In the end it came to 37 volumes].

Warathatul-Anbiyaa, p. 14.

On Shaikh Hammaad al-Ansaari’s Reading Habits

October 22, 2015 § Leave a comment


“[Shaikh Hammaad al-Ansaari] would spend many a long hour going through books or checking manuscripts, when he came across a new book or a rare manuscript he wouldn’t sleep until he had read it all, until [sometimes] it would be fajr time and he still wouldn’t have finished his reading, then it would be the time of duhaa and he would still be engrossed in reading and researching, his addiction to reading, especially manuscripts, was one of the reasons that he had a problem with his eyes, may Allaah have mercy on him.

He mentioned to me that he read Fathul-Baari twenty times.”

Al-Majmoo’ fi Tarjuma al-’Allaamah, al-Muhaddith, ash-Shaikh Hammaad ibn Muhammad al-Ansaari, vol.1, p. 213.

Ibn al-Qayyim’s Astounding Humility: Calling Himself Bankrupt Instead of a Shaikh

September 22, 2015 § 1 Comment


 

Ibn al-Qayyim wrote a priceless book on patience called Uddatus-Saabirin wa Dhakhiratush-Shakirin, out of his humility, he said the following about it and himself:

“Despite that, this book is the effort of someone who lacks the means [i.e., lacks knowledge], the output of someone bankrupt, in which he warns others against the disease even though he is among the ranks of those who suffer from it, in which he has outlined the remedy even though, due to his injustice and ignorance, he didn’t have the forbearance to use it himself, but he hopes that, through this advice which he is imparting to His believing slaves, the Most Kind and the Most Merciful will forgive the way he has cheated himself.

And so whatever in this book is correct is from Allaah, Alone, for it is He who is the Commendable, the One who helps, and whatever mistakes are found in it are from its author and the devil …”

Uddatus-Saabirin, p. 11.

Al-Fawzaan’s Humility

September 7, 2015 § Leave a comment


Host: The questioner says, ‘Ahsanallaahu ilaikum. How can we attain the knowledge of Shaikh Ibn Baaz and knowledge like yours?’

Al-Fawzaan: I don’t have knowledge—Shaikh Ibn Baaz yes, he had knowledge, may Allaah forgive and have mercy on him—as for me, then I’m a miskeen like you.

But what is obligatory on us is to learn.

Imaam Si’dee and the Camel-Driver’s Pack of Cigarettes

January 21, 2015 § Leave a comment


 

“When the people of ’Unaizah bought firewood, the camel-driver would bring it inside the house and after he’d finished the household he brought it to would leave some water and dates for him. Upon eating and drinking, the camel-driver would close the house’s door firmly intending thereby to let them know that he had left. One time the Shaikh رحمه الله [i.e., Imaam Si’dee, who was ’Uthaimeen’s teacher] bought some firewood and when the camel-driver left, our father [Imaam Si’dee] came out intending to close the door behind him.

On his way to the door, the Shaikh found a pack of cigarettes in the courtyard which the camel-driver had dropped, so he took the pack, opened the door and called him, saying, ‘Is this yours?’

After some hesitation the camel-driver replied, ‘Yes, it’s mine. But, O Shaikh, do you know what’s inside it?’

The Shaikh said, “Yes, cigarettes.’

‘And you’re giving them to me, O Shaikh?’ said the camel-driver.

‘Yes, because if you don’t find this pack you’ll go and buy another one with the money you made by selling that firewood and you will then cause your children to go hungry and prevent them from getting some sustenance—and Allaah سبحانه is the One who guides.’

So the camel-driver said, ‘Bismillaah …,’ took the pack and threw out the cigarettes that were inside, saying ‘O Allaah! I turn in repentance to You and I will never smoke again.’”

Mawaaqif Ijtimaa’iyah min Hayaatish-Shaikh, al-’Allaamah ’Abdir-Rahmaan bin Naasir as-Si’dee, pp. 68-69.

Ibn Qutaibah on the Students of Knowledge of Old

December 21, 2014 § Leave a comment


Ibn Qutaibah رحمه الله said, “In the past, a student of knowledge would listen to learn, and learn to act, and gain understanding of the religion in order to benefit himself and others. But now it has become such that they listen in order to [merely] accumulate, and they accumulate in order to be mentioned, and they memorise in order to overcome [others] and boast.”

Ibn Qutaibah said this over one thousand years ago, he passed away in 276 Hijri.

Al-Madkhal al-Mufassal li-Madhhab al-Imaam Ahmad wa Takhrijaat al-Ashaab, vol. 1, p. 13.

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