Seeing Allaah

February 15, 2019 § Leave a comment


The Shaikh of Islaam, Ibn Taymiyyah, may Allaah have mercy on him, said, “The greatest pleasure in the Hereafter is seeing Allaah, سبحانه, as occurs in the authentic hadith, ‘And so He will have not given them anything more beloved to them than looking at Him,’ and it [i.e., seeing Him] is the fruit of knowing Him and worshipping Him in this world.

So the best thing in the worldly life is knowing Him and the best thing in the Hereafter is Seeing Him.”

Majmoo al-Fataawaa, vol. 14, p. 163.

Yusuf’s Shirt عليه السلام

December 28, 2018 § Leave a comment


“Allaah said, “They stained his shirt with false blood. He said, ‘Nay, but your minds have made up a tale (that may pass) with you, (for me) patience is most fitting: Against that which ye assert, it is Allaah (alone) Whose help can be sought.’” [12:18] And He said, “Go with this my shirt, and cast it over the face of my father: he will come to see (clearly). Then come ye (here) to me together with all your family.” [12:93]

Yusuf عليه السلام sent his shirt from Egypt to his father because it was the reason for the start of his grief when they brought it to him [before], stained with blood, “And they brought his shirt stained with false blood,” so Yusuf عليه السلام wanted the end of his father’s grief to be from the same place it started, “Go with this my shirt, and cast it over the face of my father: he will come to see (clearly).”

So the grief in the story started with the shirt and ended with it.”

Ubailaan.

Ibn Taymiyyah’s Funeral

May 30, 2018 § Leave a comment


Al-Haafidh Ibn Rajab al-Hanbali said about Shaikhul-Islaam Ibn Taymiyyah’s death, “And the funeral prayer in absentia was performed over him in most of the Muslim lands, both near and far, even up to Yemen and China. And travellers related that the call for his funeral prayer was hailed in the remotest corners of China on the day of Jumu’ah [proclaiming]: ‘The funeral prayer for the Interpreter of the Quraan!’”

Dhail Tabaqaat al-Hanaabilah, vol. 2, p. 407.

Uthaimeen on Not Giving Reminders During Taraaweeh

May 28, 2018 § Leave a comment


Ibn Uthaimeen, may Allaah have mercy on him, was asked: Here in Kuwait we have a reminder after four rak’ahs during the night prayer, is that allowed? And if it is, how is this reminder to be conducted?

Uthaimeen: I hold that it should not be done. Firstly, because it isn’t from the Salaf’s guidance. Secondly, because some people like to come to tahajjud and then leave to go home [as soon as it’s finished]. Having a reminder hinders them, bores them, and forces them to stay to listen to it.

If a reminder is not received well then its harm is more than its benefit, and that is why the Prophet ﷺ used to look after his Companions by preaching to them at suitable times and wouldn’t make it burdensome for them or repetitive. So I hold that leaving it is more correct. And if the Imaam does intend to preach to the people then let him do it at the end, when the prayer has completely finished.

Source.

Also see Shaikh al-Albaani’s answers here and here, and another of Shaikh Uthaimeen’s answers here.

 

Uthaimeen on the Innovation of Giving Reminders Without a Need During Taraweeh and Imprisoning People by Doing So

May 27, 2018 § Leave a comment


Questioner: What is the ruling on always giving reminders between the Taraweeh prayer or at the middle of praying them?

Uthaimeen: As for reminders, then no, because this is not from the Salaf’s guidance, but he can admonish them if there is a need for it or after the Taraweeh, and if his intention in doing that is that it is an act of worship then it is an innovation, and the sign which shows whether it is an act of worship is that he does it every night. Additionally, I say, why, my brother, are you giving the people a reminder?

Maybe some people have something they need to do, and they are eager to finish the Taraweeh along with the Imaam and then depart with him so that they will have implemented the saying of the Prophet ﷺ, ‘Whoever stands in prayer with the Imaam until he leaves then it is recorded for him that he prayed the whole night.’

And if it is the case that you love reminders and half the people do too, or even three quarters of the people do, then don’t imprison the other quarter due to the love those three quarters have for it. Didn’t the Prophet ﷺ say, “When any one of you leads the people in prayer, he should be brief for behind him are the young, the aged, the weak and the sick,” or words to that effect ﷺ, i.e., don’t gauge the people according to yourself or to other people who love talks and reminders, [rather] gauge them according to what will give them relief—lead them in Taraweeh and then when you’ve finished and have ended your prayer and the people have too, then say what you want.

Liqaa al-Baab al-Maftooh, no. 118.

Also see Shaikh al-Albaani’s answers here and here, and another of Shaikh Uthaimeen’s answers here.

Ibn Baaz and His Vacations

May 22, 2018 § Leave a comment


Shaikh Muhammad al-Musa said about Ibn Baaz, “He never knew vacations: His Eminence, may Allaah have mercy on him, never took a single vacation during his entire working life, which lasted more than sixty years! In fact, the work he would do on Thursdays and Fridays [which was the weekend in Saudi Arabia] and [his work] during official holidays [like Eed etc.] was probably more than his work during official working days.”

Jawaanib min Seeratil-Imaam Abdil-Azeez ibn Baaz, p. 162.

Ibn Baaz and Fajr

May 20, 2018 § Leave a comment


Shaikh Muhammad al-Musa said, “Ibn Baaz, may Allaah have mercy on him, would be the one to wake his children up for Fajr and also the people working for him in his house. And it was mentioned to me that he would call eleven phone numbers to wake them up for Fajr, and when one of them would answer he would give salaam and say:

الحَمْـدُ لِلّهِ الّذي أَحْـيانا بَعْـدَ ما أَماتَـنا وَإليه النُّـشور

‘All praise is for Allaah who gave us life after having taken it from us and unto Him is the Resurrection.’”

Jawaanib min Seeratil-Imaam Ibn Baaz, rahimahullaah, p. 74.

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